Smart Sales Manager Named 2014 Book of the Year by American Association of Inside Sales Professionals

Jacket image, Smart Sales Manager by Josiane Chriqui FeigonThe American Association of Inside Sales Professionals (AA-ISP) chose Smart Sales Manager: The Ultimate Playbook for Building and Running a High-Performance Inside Sales Team by Josiane Feigon to be its Book of The Year.

Each year the AA-ISP recognizes outstanding individuals, teams, and organizations for performance and accomplishments through a variety of awards. We congratulate and send our thanks to each and every member of this elite group of individuals. Together, we are making a difference!

The AA-ISP is an international association dedicated to advancing the profession of inside sales. The association engages in research studies, organizational benchmarking and leadership round tables to better understand and analyze the trends, challenges, and key components of the growth and development of the inside sales industry.

Congratulations to Josiane and all the other award winners, and thank you, AA-ISP!

Find out what other AMACOM books have won awards.

Reminder Webcast: Speaking with Presence — Delivering Your Message with Authority and Confidence

Photo of John Baldoni, author of The Leader's Guide to Speaking with PresenceThis week, the American Management Association New Media team will be hosting a webcast with John Baldoni, author of The Leader’s Guide to Speaking With Presence: How to Project Confidence, Conviction and Authority. He will be offering techniques to help leaders achieve the kind of genuine presence that leads to lasting trust and quantifiable influence.

Apr 23, 2014
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Eastern
Fee: Complimentary
Meeting Number: 17837-00001

 With their warmth, confidence, and ability to connect, many leaders appear like they were born to the role. But that is actually rare. What seem to be innate gifts are often the result of learning and practicing communication skills. And, as a leader, your most important job is to communicate effectively. Whether in a meeting, presentation, water-cooler conversation, or formal speech, your ability to deliver a clear, believable message is the tipping point between forgettable and transformational. This webcast gives you a concise starting point to improve your communication skills. You’ll get dozens of practical tips for creating and communicating meaningful messages with presence and authority. To be a truly effective leader, your words need to ring true, and your delivery needs to be authentic. Join us as we explore:

  • How to present your ideas clearly and provide appropriate context

  • Tips for grounding yourself and radiating confidence that will put your audience at ease

  • Steps you can take to refine your public speaking delivery

  • How you should use stories to inform, involve, and inspire

  • Ways to leverage the energy of any room

Jacket image, The Leader's Guide to Speaking with PresenceSign up for John Baldoni’s AMA Webcast.

John Baldoni, president of Baldoni Consulting LLC, is an internationally recognized executive coach, speaker, and author. In 2011, Leadership Gurus International ranked John No. 11 on its list of the world’s top 30 leadership experts. He is a regular online contributor to CBS MoneyWatch, Inc., and Harvard Business Review.

Erika on Grammar Rules for Digital Communication

The following is a guest post from Associate Editor & Copy Manager Erika Spelman on  following or ignoring the rules for correct grammar and punctuation when writing emails or sending texts.

“Thanks, there’s no rush, since I don’t have a record player.”

I recently wrote this incorrectly punctuated and arguably stylistically flawed sentence in an email to someone who apologized for not yet having returned my old collection of vinyl records. I thought about it consciously before sending it. Would a period after “Thanks” be interpreted as irritation? A semicolon would have been pretentious. A dash might seem too hurried. A comma, though incorrect, seemed friendlier.

Although my last blog post argued with grammarians who frown at the use of “since” to mean “because,” I still secretly feel like I’m getting away with something not quite proper when I use it this way. “Because” in this reply would not have meant the same thing. To me, using “because” would have signified that the cause of there being no rush was that I didn’t have a record player. I did not mean to indicate a causal relationship but to mention a factor that helped explain my feeling that there was no rush.

The aforementioned email is just one example of electronic communications in which I deliberately use incorrect punctuation and less formal syntax than I would in other writing, and I know of other grammar sticklers who confess to doing the same thing. One friend, who is one of the few people I know who actually uses the word “whom” correctly in casual speech, gets worried if I end a text message with a period and will call me to see if I’m angry. Another, whose first reaction to a rather long email I showed her from someone else was that it contained no typos or grammatical mistakes, agreed with me when I described my deliberation regarding the period, semicolon, dash, and comma options in the construction “Thanks, there’s no rush.“ Yes, this shows how much I thought about it–I actually consulted someone I trust who has equal respect for the rules of grammar!

Much has been said about the butchering of the written word stemming from the conventions of text messaging. Going for the fastest and least typing-intensive means of expression is one thing; deliberately breaking rules even when it makes one feel uncomfortable to do so is another.

What rules of grammar do you knowingly break when sending electronic communications?

Erika Spelman is an associate editor and copy manager at AMACOM. She shepherds books through the production process, helps set house style, and serves as a resource regarding style, word usage, and grammar for the company. Prior to joining AMACOM, Erika worked as a principal manuscript editor at West Group and as a proofreader at Counsel Press.

Earlier Posts:
Erika on the Top Ten Copyediting Mistakes
Erika on the Noble Art of Proofreading
Erika on an Associate Editor’s Role in Interior Book Design

Webcast: Speaking with Presence — Delivering Your Message with Authority and Confidence

Photo of John Baldoni, author of The Leader's Guide to Speaking with PresenceThe American Management Association New Media team will be hosting a webcast with John Baldoni, author of The Leader’s Guide to Speaking With Presence: How to Project Confidence, Conviction and Authority. He will be offering techniques to help leaders achieve the kind of genuine presence that leads to lasting trust and quantifiable influence.

Apr 23, 2014
12:00 PM – 1:00 PM Eastern
Fee: Complimentary
Meeting Number: 17837-00001

 With their warmth, confidence, and ability to connect, many leaders appear like they were born to the role. But that is actually rare. What seem to be innate gifts are often the result of learning and practicing communication skills. And, as a leader, your most important job is to communicate effectively. Whether in a meeting, presentation, water-cooler conversation, or formal speech, your ability to deliver a clear, believable message is the tipping point between forgettable and transformational. This webcast gives you a concise starting point to improve your communication skills. You’ll get dozens of practical tips for creating and communicating meaningful messages with presence and authority. To be a truly effective leader, your words need to ring true, and your delivery needs to be authentic. Join us as we explore:

  • How to present your ideas clearly and provide appropriate context

  • Tips for grounding yourself and radiating confidence that will put your audience at ease

  • Steps you can take to refine your public speaking delivery

  • How you should use stories to inform, involve, and inspire

  • Ways to leverage the energy of any room

Jacket image, The Leader's Guide to Speaking with PresenceSign up for John Baldoni’s AMA Webcast.

John Baldoni, president of Baldoni Consulting LLC, is an internationally recognized executive coach, speaker, and author. In 2011, Leadership Gurus International ranked John No. 11 on its list of the world’s top 30 leadership experts. He is a regular online contributor to CBS MoneyWatch, Inc., and Harvard Business Review.

Random Quotes from New Books This April

Jacket image, Successful Business Process Management by Paul K. BermanSuccessful Business Process Management: What You Need to Know to Get Results by Paula K. Berman

“The exact boundaries of a process are usually somewhat arbitrary, especially when you are defining multiple interlocking procedures—where does one begin and the other end? It depends on whose point of view you want to include in the procedure. These decisions also help you determine what triggers the process.” (page 98)

Jacket image, Think Bigger by Mark Van RijmenamThink Bigger: Developing a Successful Big Data Strategy for Your Business by Mark Van Rijmenam

“Hadoop, which is named after the elephant toy of the child of the inventor of Hadoop, was developed because existing data storage processing tools appeared inadequate to handle the large amounts of data that started to appear with the growth of the Internet. First, Google developed the programming model MapReduce to cope with the flow of data that resulted from its mission to organize and make universally accessible the world’s information. Yahoo, in response, developed Hadoop in 2005 as an implementation of MapReduce. It was released as an open source tool under the Apache license.” (page 59)

Want to sample other AMACOM books? Check out our Random Quotes from New Books series.