Monthly Archives: June 2016

Nick Westergaard: Changing Times Call for Scrappy Marketers

WestergaardThe following is a guest post from Nick Westergaard, author of GET SCRAPPY: Smarter Digital Marketing for Businesses Big and Small (AMACOM April 2016).

It is a dizzying time to be in marketing. Each day we wake up and are distracted by all of the shiny new things coming at us. There are over a billion people on Facebook. Snapchat has 150 million daily active users. An excited mom in a Chewbacca mask can post a Facebook live video and dominate the news.

As marketer, it’s hard to know where to start. It’s easy to ride the tide and bounce from network to network, setting up presences everywhere for your brand, creating and sharing every new form of content. But this is neither efficient nor effective. As marketing continues to change at a breakneck pace, few have the resources to be this unfocused with their marketing.

You need to be smart. You need to get scrappy.

If you’re asking, “What is scrappy?” — let’s start with what scrappy isn’t. Scrappy isn’t marketing small. Scrappy isn’t marketing on the cheap. And, most importantly, scrappy isn’t dumbing down your marketing.

My favorite definition comes from the Urban Dictionary, which defines scrappy as describing “someone or something that appears dwarfed by a challenge, but more than compensates for seeming inadequacies through will, persistence, and heart.”

In short, anyone can get scrappy. It doesn’t matter if you’re B2B, B2C, non-profit, or government. The local dry cleaner who does its own marketing can benefit from getting scrappy just as much as a marketer in a larger organization. As Samantha Hersil, who leads digital marketing at Pacific Cycle for brands like Schwinn, Kid Trax, and Roadmaster, told me, “We all wish that we had a few people and a few dollars more.” We all face the same hurdles that can be overcome with will, persistence, and heart.

Scrappy is doing more with less. Scrappy is a spirit determined to simplify marketing in today’s complex digital world. Scrappy is thinking like an underdog (even if you aren’t) with a winning and determined mindset. Let’s explore that mindset a little further.

Brains Before Budget — When you start to think about personnel, tools, and technology, digital marketing can get real expensive real fast. Remember, getting scrappy is more than just being cheap. It’s about getting smart first so you can do more with less, putting your brains before your budget.

Faced with all of these shiny new things, too many marketers skip strategy. Before you rush to plant the flag on a new social network, ask yourself, what is it you’re trying to accomplish? What’s your business objective?

Market Like a Mousetrap — “No one’s ever bothered to build a better mousetrap.” That’s because the mousetrap is both effective and efficient. Like the mousetrap, to get scrappy with your marketing, you have to be both effective and efficient. To be effective, your objective has to be clearly defined first (the trap’s objective is pretty obvious) so that you know when the job is done (snap!).

Efficiency provides the best construct for a more scrappy relationship with money. Being efficient is more than just being cheap. You’ve still met your desired objective. You’ve just done so with minimal expense.

See Ideas Everywhere — Stay open to ideas from outside your industry. “Nope. That’s a B2C idea. We’re B2B. That won’t work here.” Or perhaps, “That’s too business-y. We’re a non-profit and things are sooooooo different for us.” Many times you can have an even greater impact because it’s an approach that’s not often taken in your industry. Cloud-computing giant Salesforce developed an app that allowed fans to create custom Valentine’s Day e-cards to share via social media. Wait! Isn’t Valentine’s Day a consumer-focused holiday? Isn’t Salesforce a B2B company? Maybe, but they had some fun and stood out in a big way by daring to think beyond their own sector stereotypes.

Technology is moving too fast for you to be confined by the ideas in your industry. To stay ahead, you have to learn to collect insights and ideas from beyond your specific niche and industry.

To get scrappy with your marketing you need to remember to (1) put your brains before your budget, (2) market like a mousetrap, and (3) see ideas everywhere. Then and only then can you start doing more with less. More isn’t always better. Sometimes it’s just more. By embracing this mindset, you can get scrappy with your marketing as others are already doing—at organizations big and small.

Are you ready to get scrappy with your marketing?

 

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Nick Westergaard is Chief Brand Strategist at Brand Driven Digital, where he helps build better brands at organizations of all sizes — from small businesses to Fortune 500 companies to the President’s Jobs Council. An in-demand speaker at conferences throughout the world, he also teaches branding and marketing at the University of Iowa and hosts the popular On Brand podcast

 

Micaela Cook Karlsen on Making a Plant-Based Diet Socially Sustainable

KarlsenEmbracing a plant-based diet is a personal choice. But it takes a community to get charged up about plant-based eating. “It’s important to make friends who are already committed to a plant-based diet, because we all need that kind of shared experience and support,” says Micaela Cook Karlsen, author of A PLANT-BASED LIFE: Your Complete Guide to Great Food, Radiant Health, Boundless Energy, and a Better Body (AMACOM July 2016). “Close conversation, the immediacy of the energy in a room full of like-minded people, and the personal feedback and sharing offer reassurance and normalcy.” To find and build your own plant-based eating circle:

  • Use the internet and social media to make new, plant-based connections in your own backyard. Vegan and vegetarian MeetUp groups are popular and growing so may be the fastest path to live connections where you live.
  • Identify local plant-friendly restaurants and grocery stores. Check their bulletin boards for announcements of groups, potluck dinners, or other interesting events that might yield a plant-based community to surround yourself with.
  • Take an inventory of your friends, coworkers, and acquaintances to assess who may be open to or curious about plant-based diets. Then, reach out and invite them to try a new recipe with you or join you for an event.
  • Go to a local potluck dinner or gathering. Don’t let being solo hold you back; plant-based groups are typically welcoming to newcomers. Even if you don’t feel like fast friends with the others you meet for the first time, you’ll experience a deep pleasure in sharing food with a group that values and prioritizes plant-based eating. Plus, you’ll get to taste some delicious new dishes!
  • Throw your own potluck dinner or themed party (the theme being all plant-based food, please). Invite your new plant-based acquaintances. Invite old friends too, explaining that you are hosting a get-together to try out some exciting new dishes and encourage everyone to experiment with new cooking. Serve a fabulous dessert to delight all your guests, including omnivores.
  • Join the Community Supported Agriculture movement, connecting local farmers directly with consumers. CSA members purchase a share of the farm’s produce for the season, ready for pick up on a weekly basis. This offers an affordable way to buy local, fresh, often organic vegetables. You’ll know exactly where your food comes from and develop a relationship with the people growing it.
  • Get involved with plant-based groups. Is there a vegetarian society in your area? A parents’ group working to improve school food? Volunteer to help!

Cover of A Plant-Based Life by Micaela Cook Karlsen

Adapted from A Plant-Based Life: Your Complete Guide to Great Food, Radiant Health, Boundless Energy, and a Better Body by Micaela Cook Karlsen (AMACOM July 2016).

MICAELA COOK KARLSEN, MSPH, is one of the founding employees of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies and its former Executive Director. A contributor to the New York Times bestseller Forks Over Knives, she is a member of the advisory board for the Plant-Based Nutrition Healthcare Conference and founder of www.PlantBasedResearch.org.

Profiles in Personal Resilience, from STRONGER: Pat Rummerfield

StrongerToday on our blog we’re featuring one of the inspiring individuals featured in STRONGER: Develop the Resilience You Need to Succeed, by George S. Everly Jr., Ph.D, Douglas A. Strouse, Ph.D., and Dennis K. McCormack, Ph.D. These writers–a stress management expert, a skilled entrepreneur, and a Navy SEAL–draw on their own unique perspectives, extensive research on resilience, and wide-ranging examples of standout people to show why some thrive under pressure while others succumb to it. One of these standout people is Patrick Rummerfield.

PATRICK ‘PAT’ RUMMERFIELD

Patrick “Pat” Rummerfield is not only a living example of tenacity; he is a living miracle—the world’s first fully recovered, functioning quadriplegic. Born in 1953 into an abusive family, Rummerfield was removed from his home at an early age and placed in an orphanage. By the age of 7, when he was adopted, Pat had learned to be a fighter.

On September 20, 1974, at age 21, Rummerfield and a friend, in the midst of a bachelor party, were in a car accident. While traveling at a speed of 135 miles per hour, Rummerfield’s car left the road and hit a ditch with such force that, on impact, the passenger’s seat was sheared away from the car. He went halfway through the windshield, popped his right eye out of its socket, sliced his scalp, and, along with breaking just about every bone in his body, broke his neck in four places—vertebrae C-3, 4, 5, and 6—crucial to mobility. At C-4, 85 percent of his spinal cord was severed. According to the initial evaluation, Rummerfield would have only 72 hours to live. A week later, his doctors declared that, despite beating staggering odds against surviving, he would live his remaining life as a quadriplegic from the neck down. In the 1970s, most quads were sent to nursing homes with a life expectancy of only three to five years.

Unable to move anything, Rummerfield was also paralyzed with fear about how he could possibly cope, emotionally, how he could take care of himself, physically, and who would take care of him, financially. “These questions run through your mind late at night,” Rummerfield reflects. “I remember watching the night janitor buff the floor… Three months earlier, I would have been thinking that poor guy, life dealt him a rough hand…Lying in the bed, I would have given anything to be buffing the floor at 1 in the morning.”

Rummerfield’s comeback began when he was lying in bed thinking about how much he would like to play basketball, and how he would love to drive a race car. At that point, his toe moved. Against his physician’s advice, Rummerfield insisted on beginning a regimen of intensive daily physical therapy.

Thanks to his relentless tenacity, Rummerfield has recovered the ability to use his arms and legs—powerfully. In October 1992, he competed in an Ironman triathlon. In 1997, he became one of only 82 people in history to complete the Antarctica Marathon. Chosen to become a member of Christopher Reeve’s rehabilitation team, Pat Rummerfield now works on the staff of the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s International Center for Spinal Cord Injury at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institution. He also gives presentations on spinal cord rehabilitation, as well as resilience.

See our previous Profile in Personal Resilience here: Abbey-Robin Tillery

***

Adapted from STRONGER: Develop the Resilience You Need to Succeed (AMACOM August 2015).

Dr. George Everly, Jr., Ph.D., is considered one of the “founding fathers” of the modern era of stress management and disaster mental health. He currently serves as Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Professor of Psychology at Loyola University Maryland, and Executive Director of Resiliency at UMBC Training Centers.

Douglas A. Strouse, Ph.D., is the Managing Partner of Wexley Consulting HRD, LLC, an international management and consulting firm. He is also the founder of Global Data Source LLC, a national data management and services firm, and is founder and President of the Chief Executive Officers Club (CEO) of Baltimore, a nonprofit organization that provides an educational forum for executives of small and mid-size companies.

Dennis K. McCormack, Ph.D., is one of the original Navy SEALs, and he pioneered SEAL combat doctrine and tactics in Vietnam. Serving as a supervisory psychologist for the Department of Defense (Army), he received official commendation for meritorious performance of duty for demonstrated professionalism and dedicated commitment to excellence as Chief, Department of Behavioral Medicine, Winn Army Community Hospital, Fort Stewart, Georgia.

Now Available on NetGalley: SELL WITH A STORY

Cover art for Sell with a Story by Paul Smith, September 2016Great salespeople know how important it is to make themselves and their product memorable, to create a rapport with their customers, and to position what they’re selling as a true solution. What better way to accomplish all of this and more than through a story? Paul Smith knows how valuable stories can be, and he shares why and how in SELL WITH A STORY: How to Capture Attention, Build Trust, and Close the Sale (AMACOM September 2016). Journalists, booksellers, book reviewers, librarians, and media professionals interested in sales and storytelling are invited to request Sell with a Story for review.

Stories sell. Great SALES STORIES sell even more.

Despite all the high-tech tools available to salespeople, the most personal method still works best.

Storytelling packs the emotional punch to turn routine presentations into productive relationships. It explains products or services in ways that resonate; it connects people and creates momentum. Stories speak to the part of the brain where decisions are made.

Paul Smith, author of the acclaimed Lead with a Story, shifts his best-selling formula to the sales arena. In Sell with a Story, he identifies the ingredients of the most effective sales stories and reveals how to:

Select the right story • Craft a compelling and memorable narrative • Incorporate challenge, conflict, and resolution • Use stories to introduce yourself, build rapport, address objections, add value, bring data to life, create a sense of urgency, and more

Complete with model stories, skill-building exercises, and enlightening examples from Microsoft, Costco, Xerox, Abercrombie & Fitch, Hewlett Packard, and other top companies, this powerful and practical guide gives you the tools you need to turn your experiences into stories that sell.

PAUL SMITH is a popular speaker and expert trainer on business storytelling techniques. A former Procter & Gamble executive, his clients include Hewlett Packard, Bayer Medical, Progressive Insurance, Walmart, and other distinguished companies. As the author of Lead with a Story, his work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Inc., Time, Forbes, The Washington Post, Success, and Investor’s Business Daily.

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Now Available on NetGalley: A PLANT-BASED LIFE

Cover art for A Plant-Based Life by Micaela Cook Karlsen, July 2016Plant-based diets are growing and growing in popularity, but it takes more than a resolution to eat more broccoli to commit to a plant-based life. Micaela Cook Karlsen, recognized expert in plant-based nutrition and a co-launcher of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies, shows how anyone can go plant-based in A PLANT-BASED LIFE: Your Complete Guide to Great Food, Radiant Health, Boundless Energy, and a Better Body (AMACOM July 2016). Journalists, booksellers, book reviewers, librarians, and media professionals interested in health, nutrition, and/or the plant-based diet are invited to request A Plant-Based Life for review.

Whole food for a whole new you.

More people than ever are eating a whole-food, plant-based diet. Studies show that it is better for our bodies and better for the planet—but it isn’t always easy.

Let A Plant-Based Life be your guide. Whether you’re taking your first steps on this path to wellness or recommitting yourself to success, author Micaela Cook Karlsen clearly maps the way. Her program enables you to set your own pace and stay the course—without relying on willpower. Drawing on personal experience and the latest research, she reveals how to:

• Find and sustain your motivation

• Gradually add more whole, plant foods into your diet, crowding out less nutritious fare

• Break old food addictions and establish new habits

• Translate favorite recipes to create delicious, nourishing meals

• Reshape your food environment (at home, at work, and on the go) to make healthy eating a no-brainer

• Cultivate relationships that celebrate and support your new lifestyle

Especially valuable are directions for navigating roadblocks. Here you’ll find strategies for getting family members on board and for allaying friends’ concerns about your food choices with evidence-based nutrition information. Take advantage of shopping tips, pantry lists, menu plans, and more than 100 mouth watering recipes, with contributions from plant-based leaders including Ann Crile Esselstyn, Cathy Fisher, Chef AJ, Craig Cochran, Chef Del Sroufe, Jeff Novick RD, Julieanna Hever MS RD CPT, Kathy Pollard MS, Kris Carr, Matthew Kenney, Matthew Lederman, MD, Micah Risk, Priscilla Timberlake and Lewis Freedman RD, Robby Barbaro, and Susan Benigas.

If your goal is a healthier, more energized—exuberant—life, make this book your personal GPS. The journey will be more satisfying than you ever imagined.

MICAELA COOK KARLSEN, MSPH, is one of the founding employees of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies and its former Executive Director. A contributor to the New York Times bestseller Forks Over Knives, she is a member of the advisory board for the Plant-Based Nutrition Healthcare Conference and founder of www.PlantBasedResearch.org.

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NetGalley is a service for people who read and recommend books, such as book reviewers, journalists, librarians, professors, booksellers, and bloggers.

There are a number of different reading options for this e-galley:

Find all of AMACOM’s e-galleys on NetGalley.

You can review how to get AMACOM’s digital galley request approval on NetGalley HERE.

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